California Real Estate Fraud Report

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27
Mar

Fannie Mae Sales Associate Indicted for Demanding Kickbacks for REO Referrals

A former Fannie Mae employee who demanded kickbacks in exchange for handing out REO listings (REO fraud) got stung when a real estate broker informed the feds and participated in taking down the man.

Armando Granillo, 44, who worked out of Fannie Mae’s Irvine, California office as an REO specialist, has been indicted on three counts of wire fraud. Granillo’s job was to review applications from prospective listing agents for Fannie Mae foreclosures.

The honest broker is located in Tucson, Arizona. Granillo travelled to Phoenix to meet the broker in anticipation of a 20% “referral fee” for himself, which amounted to $11,200 of the broker’s legitimate commissions. During the meeting, which was recorded by the investigators from the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s Office of Inspector General, Granillo is alleged to have stated that the kickbacks were “a natural part of business.”

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California is the prosecuting agency for this case. Armando Granillo is out on bail pending his arraignment. Read a copy of their press release by clicking here.

This prosecution for REO fraud is a first . . . and just the tip of the iceberg for this type of real estate fraud. Any real estate agent who has sold REO properties knows that kickbacks to bank employees occurs. Some of the worst REO listing agents get listing after listing and yet do a poor job of marketing, showing and maintaining bank-owned properties, even ones where their relatives get the trash-out and remodeling contracts from the banks. They rarely, if ever, respond to or return phone calls from buyers’ agents. Ever wonder why that is?

The good news is that REO listings are significantly down  – 67%  according to my research – in certain sections of Los Angeles. So REO fraud is being extinguished as banks have come to the astounding conclusion after seven long years that it makes better business sense to do short sales or provide creative financing terms to keep borrowers in their homes than to foreclose.

Read the original article in Inman News.

© Copyright 2007-2017 Monique Bryher

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The information and notices contained on The California Real Estate Fraud Report are intended to summarize recent developments in real estate fraud, mortgage fraud, short sale fraud, REO fraud, appraisal fraud, loan modification scams, loan modification fraud and other real estate related crimes occurring in Los Angeles and California. The posts on this site are presented as general research and information and are expressly not intended, and should not be regarded, as legal advice. Much of the information on this site concerns allegations made in civil lawsuits and in criminal indictments. All persons are presumed innocent until convicted of a crime. Readers who have particular questions about real estate fraud, mortgage fraud and appraisal fraud matters or who believe they require legal counsel should seek the advice of an attorney.

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